Adventure park is an insult to military, veterans

Adventure park is an insult to military, veterans

 

Ad in a Dells’ tourist magazine.

By Chuck Woodbury
I am offended by an attraction in the Wisconsin Dells. It’s called the D-Day Invasion Adventure Park.

D-Day, for the two or three readers who do not know, was a major, decisive battle of World War II. On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of French coastline, to fight a heavily fortified Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy.

It was a brutal battle, with Allied soldiers mowed down by the thousands. All together, more than 9,000 Allied soldiers were killed or wounded. 

These men were my father’s generation, the Greatest Generation according to journalist Tom Brokaw. My father was not on that beach, but he piloted a B-24 Liberator aircraft over Germany on 35 missions, with terrible odds of surviving. Lucky for him (and me) he did. But he watched his friends get blasted out of the sky, plummeting to fiery deaths 20,000 feet below.

Allied troops land in Normandy.

And so, to me, an amusement park, or adventure park, whatever you call it, named after D-Day, is blasphemy. It’s a slap in the face to all those brave men who risked their lives, or gave their young lives, in defense of the freedom for all those threatened by the sicko, evil madman Adolf Hitler. The park is an insult to anyone who served his or her country.

To top it off, an ad for the D-Day Invasion Park in a local tourist magazine, includes an illustration of a smiling Bigfoot creature in an army helmet. 

Who thought up this park? The whole idea of it makes me sick.

 

 

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13 thoughts on “Adventure park is an insult to military, veterans

  1. Mike Roberts

    Actually, a visit to ANY National Cemetary
    is enough to answer why!

  2. David Satori

    I can’t think of a bigger insult to the brave men that landed on that beach. Normandy should be remembered for what it was and what was accomplished. I’m sure an amusement park was not on their minds that day. They are called the greatest generation and I couldn’t agree more.

  3. Mark Gaunt

    As a vet I’d never go to a park like that.

  4. Carolyn

    I agree with all of your comments, it is a terrible choice for an amusement park name. Certainly someone could have been more creative.

  5. Gene Bjerke

    There is an excellent D-Day Memorial in Bedford, Va, The idea came from honoring the “Bedford Boys.” All of the soldiers from Bedford were killed in the invasion.

  6. Susan Kaltenbach

    My dad served in the Pacific Theatre in WWII. He died two years ago but I believe he would have felt exactly as you do. Everytime I saw that critter in that helmet it rubbed me the wrong way-finally when I read your article I understood why it bothered me so. There is absolutely NOTHING amusing about war and all those who died should be honored. Thank you for putting into words what many others probably feel.

  7. JIM SMITH

    I DO APPRECIATE all our service men and women who sacrifice ALL or some part their of for my freedom.
    But, I am still PISSED OFF the way the men and women of my time were treated when returning from Nam. They went over their, mostly not by choice, and a lot sacrificed it all. When the others came home, they were spat upon. I, thank God, was to young to go. I only missed it by about four years. These men and women never asked for that “conflict” and had no choice but to go. So I believe they should be given a great big I’M SORRY and an extra THANK YOU for their service.

    1. Chuck Woodbury

      Jim,
      It’s sad the way they were treated at first. But eventually the public understood and honored them as they should have been honored when they returned from their service.

    2. Greg Montgomery

      Jim, you are right to be pissed off. It was not handled right at all.

  8. Karen

    Kind of like the prez saying “congratulations” to a Purple Heart recipient. Completely tone deaf, although the intention is good.

    There seem to be a lot of folks who haven’t actually seen active duty or lived through horrific battles such as this one who nonetheless want to glorify the event.

    My father-in-law flew a bomber in WWII, came back one day to find his ship torpedoed. Lucky for him (and my husband), he survived the war, but never really wanted to talk about it. He’d seen enough.

    My parents, on the other hand, barely came to age at the end of the war, never saw any actual active duty, and insist on glorifying war at every given turn. To be fair, they surely appreciated the sacrifice, but I can’t help but wonder if they really actually ever think about what’s involved in war.

  9. Tom Gutzke

    I live in Wisconsin just 100 miles from The Dells and never heard a thing about this so-called “amusement park”. I hope people realize that trying to glamorize a horrible day of death in our history should be the last thing someone would do.

  10. KC

    Totally agree! Some time ago, I ran across a full page newspaper ad, indicating a “Happy” Memorial Day sale at our local car dealership. I wrote the manager and owners a letter, on real paper, no less, reminding them of the history and significance of the day. Received an excuse and an apology letter in return. Better than nothing, I suppose, and never saw a repeat from them. Still lights my fire to see others doing same though!

  11. Bob Godfrey

    As a combat veteran I have to agree with your sentiment Chuck. What I find most disturbing these days is the fact that there are no “boundaries” when it comes to any form of standards for decency, language, individual rights, common courtesies etc. etc. And I blame not just the people but the media and advertisers who support them because they seem to look for new ways to shock and sell their products and increase ratings.

    One trip to Arlington National Cemetery is enough to answer why.

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