Ancient villages preserved in Colorado monument

Ancient villages preserved in Colorado monument

 

hoop-772
National Park Service photo

Walk in ancient footsteps. Soak in the silence. Marvel at a night sky overflowing with stars. Hear a lone coyote’s howl. Experience the past at Hovenweep National Monument near Cortez, Colorado.

Hovenweep preserves six villages once inhabited by the ancestors of today’s Pueblo people. Once home to more than 2,500 people, Hovenweep includes six prehistoric villages built between A.D. 1200 and 1300. The structures evoke an ancient time — one filled with the sights and sounds of a vibrant and dynamic culture.

hoop-camp-772
Campsite at 31-space campground. NPS photo.

Family groups built their homes at the heads of canyons, surrounding life-giving seep springs that provided water, cooler temperatures, and shade from the cottonwood and hackberry trees that grew there. Perched on the canyon rims, these villages have weathered the centuries, owing to their solid foundations and careful construction. The towers and rooms of Hovenweep are unique in the style and quality of their masonry. Stones are carefully shaped and small rocks and mortar fill the gaps between, keeping out sun, cold, wind, and any small creatures. 

The park has a primitive, 31-space campground that can accommodate RVs up to 36 feet. Sites include tent pads, fire rings and picnic tables with shade structures, however there are no hookups available. The fee is $10 a night on a first-come, first served basis.

Learn more about the park


RVT 772

Facebooktwitterpinteresttumblrmail

Related

3 thoughts on “Ancient villages preserved in Colorado monument

  1. JIm Stein

    This site was one of the true highlights of our trip through the Southwest; amazing in every way. The interpretive information provided gives a great insight into these early peoples. We stayed at a lovely little RV park in Cortez.

  2. Robbie

    I remember only two campsites that can accommodate a rig that is 36′ long.

    1. Chuck Woodbury

      Robbie, there’s a million acres of public land in that area where the “boondocking” is free. You could put a 150-foot RV just about anywhere out there. –Chuck/editor

Comments are closed.