Furkot: A funny name for a great trip planner

Furkot: A funny name for a great trip planner

 

A trip plan on Furkot.com

By Chris Guld  GeeksOnTour.com

There is no perfect Trip-Planning system, but that doesn’t stop us from continuing to look for one! Here’s a list of systems we have used:

  1. Streets & Trips (we even have a full set of tutorial videos on using this one)
  2. RoadTrippers – see article Roadtrippers for Trip Planning
  3. RVTripWizard – see article RV Trip Wizard for Planning your RV Travels
  4. Google Maps – not really a trip-planner, but everything else! Google’s My Maps and Custom POI Files, Mapping and Sharing Your Travels with Google My Maps

The latest system we are checking out is Furkot.com. It is a free website. There is no mobile app, but the mobile website works fine on either iPhone or Android. Furkot is not specific to RVs. It is generally for cars and motorcycles who need to book motels/hotels along the way. But campgrounds are in there as well and it is based on Google Maps so all the data in Google is available.

Yes, you need an Internet connection to plan your trip, but then it can be available offline for reference.

Planning a Trip with Furkot

It works a lot like Streets & Trips – that’s a good thing since we were so accustomed to S&T:

  1. Start a Trip by entering your beginning and your end destination. One additional feature that I haven’t seen in any other system is a checkbox to make it a “Round Trip.”
  2. Furkot automatically enters tentative night stops based on your settings for when you start and stop your day and how far you want to go. When you enter your own stops, the tentative ones will disappear. I LOVE this feature for showing us exactly where we need to be looking for our overnight stops.
  3. Dates: a feature that was always sorely missing in S&T was any kind of calendaring. With Furkot, it not only shows the date you will arrive/leave any given stop – you can also point to any place along your route and see what time of day you’ll be there! Here is what the “Plan” drawer looks like. Notice the Days and dates for each stop. And, if you change the start date, or the number of nights at any stop – the dates recalculate for every other stop. There is even a feature to “Lock” a date. So, for example, if you need to arrive in time to attend a wedding, you can lock that stop’s date and it will not let you recalculate other items in a way that gets you there late!

Navigating a Trip that was Planned with Furkot

Furkot is not a navigation system, it is a planning system. That makes a lot of sense to me. I see them as very different things. We use a Rand McNally RVND7720 to navigate with the RV. It is always on the dashboard, and it has only one job to do. Each day as we set off on the road, we’ll look at our plan and enter just today’s destination into the Rand McNally. Then, we trust it to avoid low bridges, and propane restricted tunnels etc. We also use Google Maps on our phones. With Furkot, I can see our plan on the phone, tap on one destination and tap on Navigate. That takes me to Google Maps and it starts navigating to that destination. Good enough for me!

If you are the type of traveler that wants your entire route imported from your plan to your dashboard GPS, they’ve got you covered!

Furkot’s export options

We’ll try it out

We leave for a 3 month journey at the end of the week. We will use Furkot and write more about it in future articles, and on our Facebook Page. Let us know if you give it a try by using the comments below. If you’re looking for a trip-planning system, you owe it to yourself to take a look at Furkot. They have an extensive help system that explains everything you need to know.

Chris Guld is President and Teacher-in-Chief at GeeksOnTour.com. She has been in computer training and support since 1983 and owned a Computer Training Center called Computer Savvy from 1983-1996. She has been a Fulltime RVer, popular seminar presenter at RV Rallies, and regular contributor to RVTravel, for many years.

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11 thoughts on “Furkot: A funny name for a great trip planner

  1. Michael

    Old topic – but – I also use MS Streets and Trips. Have since 2003. My Motor Home navigation is a small computer connected to a 10 inch monitor. I can’t see detail well enough on a smaller monitor while I drive. I have looked at other Garmin, Rand McNally, Tom-Tom and the like, but screen size is still an issue. This program might be worth a look, but while navigating on the road, without Internet connection, I have not found anything that beats MS S&T.

  2. MrOak

    I took a look at Furkot to see how I would like it. As a test I tried planning a trip from lower NH to Saratoga Springs NY for the Travers Cup race weekend.
    Obviously it was my first view of the software but there seemed to nothing oriented toward RV trips in it. The estimated time to travel was off because it was assuming car and there was no setting for RV. It suggested I stay at a Motel 6 and although it said it had campgrounds in it I could not see any. I have stayed in the area on previous years in RV Parks so I know they are there.
    Was I missing something?

  3. Raquel

    We’ve been using Furkot for a year or better. In February we started traveling fulltime and Furkot is, for us, the best planning tool we’ve come across. It’s not intended to replace the GPS, but to help in planning a route. It doesn’t work with coordinates, but rather with place names and addresses.

    One of the greatest things is that if we want to change our route because of weather or because we want to see something along the way, Furkot will change with us and adjust our route, the timing of subsequent stops and where we stop.

  4. George

    You’ve hit a home run with this one.
    I was using http://www.mapquest.com for the last several years but they changed the format.
    I have been exploring other travel sites.
    I’m a life member of Good Sam and don’t care much for their planner but this Furkot is fabulous.
    I enter my start and end cities, then double click on a city I want to go through and voila my new route is set. I’ve registered and it saves all my planned routing. I think I’ll be using this for a long time to come.

  5. Bill Forbes

    I still use the old Rand McNally Tripmaker program – CD based, not the current version on the web. In addition to campgrounds and hotels for end of day accommodations, it has a lot of features not available in any other program, including that you can enter dates, times you want to drive, speeds for different types of roads, even when you want to take rest stops. I wish they still supported it. Even though the map is now out of date, it still is the best RV trip planning program I have tried.

  6. Penny

    Tried it for the next leg of our trip north and it worked great! I really like it how it comes up with the map of the whole route. And it was the same route that Mapquest gave us. We will add this to our traveling arsenal.

    Now, to go back and see if we can add some restaurants or stuff.

  7. Brian

    Second comment – different topic – somewhat related. As a former 48 state trucker – 10 years – and now fulltime RVer – 10 years – I would caution anyone who thinks any map or GPS or list of any kind is going to tell you where all low bridges or low clearances are. I know from experience that there are many bridges that appear on no list. I have even looked on state DOT or DMV lists claiming to list all low clearances and I can still find locations that are not listed anywhere or shown on any map. Be aware that only your eyes and very careful judgement can prevent encountering a low clearance. Always use caution. Most of these locations are marked with signs indicating height but some are not. Please do not become over confident.

    1. RV Staff

      Speaking of which … At almost the exact same time you were posting this comment, Brian, a U-Haul truck was driven under/into the historic Arboretum Aquaduct (on the National Register of Historic Places) in Seattle. It has less than a 10-foot clearance and is clearly marked, including signs approaching either side of it to measure the height of your vehicle, an alarm which sounds if it’s too tall, and a turnaround spot if you can’t fit under the bridge. The warnings don’t do any good if the driver isn’t paying attention, unfortunately. (Coincidentally, as I read your comment, my brain flashed on the Arboretum Aquaduct, under which I have driven hundreds of times. Then, a short while later, I looked at our local news online and there was the story of the U-Haul truck hitting it this afternoon.) –Diane

  8. Brian

    Tried Furkot for about a half hour – can’t figure it out. It seems to time out before we can do much of anything as far as planning. It will not use decimal degrees which seems to be the standard for land travel in RVers these days – as well as the easiest format to use by far.

    We are old Streets & Trips users and have not found anything that can compare. We use our S&T with our Garmin to catch anything lacking in S&T due to the discontinuation. Since we do get to areas that lack consistent internet we require systems that are totally offline.

    Hopefully you will figure out how to use this furkot and let us know how to simplify using it but at this point it has a long way to go before it will be of much use to us. Thanks.

    By the way – on a personal note – we do not use Facebook or any other time wasting social media so always want ways to view content without necessitating using these websites. When given a choice we would rather do without the info than spend time on places like Facebook.

    1. Buzzelectric

      I could not use it either. You also have to sign up. No thanks. Facebook is a dangerous tool. It is there to make money.

  9. Full timers

    I have always used streets and trips as the navigator on an old computer. It has become somewhat out dated and wishing Microsoft would resurrect it doesn’t help. But each new program like this one, I try, I discard. So as long as streets and trips program works and I can find an old computer to run it on, I will continue to use it. An RV GPS on the dash keeps us away from low bridges and gives Hubby lane changes.

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