Seventy million vehicles at risk of exploding airbags

Seventy million vehicles at risk of exploding airbags

The seemingly never-ending safety concerns of the automotive industry have been further complicated by the vastly expanded airbag recall involving parts made by Takata.

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 8.34.46 AMAt risk, according the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, are now close to 70 million vehicles from nearly every major and some niche manufacturers.

The expansion primarily affects passenger-side inflators not covered by previous recalls. It will also cover inflators in vehicles made by Jaguar-Land Rover, Tesla Motors and Fisker Automotive for the first time. Fourteen other auto companies including American Honda, Ford, Toyota, Mercedes-Benz, BMW, General Motors, Nissan and Fiat-Chrysler already are affected by the original recall.

Takata is responsible for replacing 29 million faulty inflators already involved with the largest recall campaign in U.S. history. The expanding recall, which includes 35 to 40 million vehicles, covers all Takata inflators using an ammonium nitrate propellant that lacks a chemical additive to prevent moisture absorption, known as a desiccant. Check with your local auto or RV dealer to see if your vehicle is affected.

SOURCE: The Weekly Driver

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2 thoughts on “Seventy million vehicles at risk of exploding airbags

  1. Leanne

    Breakaway Honday here in Greenville, SC has provided rental cars for their customers. We’ve been told to park our cars and not to drive it until the parts come in. That’s customer care. Thank you , Breakaway.

  2. DFS

    We got a recall letter on our Toyota Corolla passenger side airbag. The notice says DO NOT DRIVE the vehicle until its replaced!
    OK but the parts are on BACK ORDER with a waiting list so who knows when we can get it replaced.
    We are traveling across the USA so getting the parts is a NATIONWIDE problem at all the dealers we have talked too.
    So….I guess we just keep driving it like we did before we knew of the problem?

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