Why use synthetic blocks under tires on asphalt?

Why use synthetic blocks under tires on asphalt?

gary-736Dear Gary,
You have recommended using non-absorbing, synthetic blocks under the footprint of the tires when parked on asphalt. Would you explain why? —Don B.

Dear Don,
I do tend to favor blocking under the tires, to raise them up off whatever surface you store the rig on, especially if it’s stored on asphalt. Simply put, petrochemicals can be damaging to rubber components. Using the plastic blocks keeps the tires dry and out of contact with the asphalt.

I’m not a fan of wood blocking for long-term storage since wood has a tendency to absorb and hold moisture. The less moisture, the less chance of mold and mildew to develop and grow. Moisture can also attract and sustain certain critters. If I’m away from the coach, I’d rather it be high and dry. Granted, the advantage might be subtle and likely immeasurable, but old habits are just hard to break.

Read more from Gary Bunzer at the RVdoctor.com. See Gary’s videos about RV repair and maintenance.

##RVT845

 

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6 thoughts on “Why use synthetic blocks under tires on asphalt?

  1. Rusty

    I disagree, used those yellow leveling blocks under each tire, dually rear wheel set-up. Within one day plastic sunk into the pave tarmac. Have used pressure treated 2×6 pieces under all tires and levers sense, never an issue again

  2. Billy Bob Thorton

    Just park it and forget it. This happens when you have too much time on your hands.

  3. Booneyrat

    I have been using pressure treated boards for years under RV tires and have never had a problem with moisture or “critters”the plastic contraptions buckle under weight also. The use of plastic,which is a derivative of crude oil, also adds to the landfills when said plastic is worn out…boards are biodegradable.

  4. Irv

    How about long term parking (for leveling purposes) on pressure treated plywood?

  5. Tommy Molnar

    How about just parking on our concrete “RV” parking spot?

    As Gary says, “Granted, the advantage might be subtle and likely immeasurable, but old habits are just hard to break”.

    Let’s not overthink this stuff . . .

  6. Bruce

    How about rubber pads made out of recycled tires? Do they fall under the petrochemical label?

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