Words not meant to be read or understood

How are you supposed to read this movie poster? A lot of movie posters use this super-condensed typeface. I guess they need to get a lot of people’s names in without using much space. But I don’t think the designers really expect you to read the names. On AM radio stations, where there are lots of obnoxious car ads, it’s next to impossible to understand the announcer as he reads all the fine print — you know —loan terms, rates, etc. I’d guess they pack about 20 seconds of normal talk into about six seconds. Crazy!

6 Thoughts to “Words not meant to be read or understood”

  1. Tom

    This keeps lawyers employed.

  2. RV Staff

    I worked for an attorney for more than 40 years. When his hearing began to fail, during some phone conversations he would say, “You’re talking faster than I can hear.” And the person on the other end of the line would usually slow down. —Diane at RVtravel.com

  3. Calvin Rittenhouse

    I’ve heard some of that same high-speed speech accompanied by fast-moving text in pharmaceutical-commercial warnings. The marketing messages are easy to read and hear.

    However, the ones in movies and TV shows are the work of agents and others who see having their clients’ names credited with somehow help with getting work or something.

  4. Tommy Molnar

    When hear this ‘fast talk’ you can be sure nobody really WANTS you to understand or follow it. That’s usually where you are told how you’re about to be screwed somehow . . .

    Nobody reads movie posters, and they know it.

  5. Kevin

    In the past, screen credits scrolled up the screen slowly enough to read. Now they fly up the screen so fast you have to pause the playback to read them. It seems everything and everybody is in a hurry these days.

  6. Edie Watson

    Experience the same “speed talk” while attempting to grab the weather specifics on the Weather Channel. Think all meteorologists must have to pass a speed talking course. Annoying!

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