2019 Chevy Silverado introduces new Advanced Trailering System

The 2019 Chevy Silverado will be available to tow your fifth-wheel trailer, but this year with a little hi-tech pizazz to make the process easier and safer, reports CNET. It’s called the Advanced Trailering System (ATS), a package that comes standard on some Silverado pickups and available as an option on others.

Chevy claims that a number of new features should make towing less of a pain. Hallelujah! For instance, ATS adds hitch-guidance with hitch-view to a built-in backup camera. This makes the typically arduous task of aligning your trailer hitch with the trailer easier thanks to dedicated guidelines in the reversing display.

Once you’re backed up into perfect alignment with your trailer, the last thing you want is to put your truck into park and have it roll so it’s just slightly out of alignment. Chevy has something for this too – it’s called Auto Parking Brake Assist and it turns on automatically when hitch-view is being used.

The ATS also includes trailer tire pressure monitoring, a system that will allow a driver to monitor trailer tire pressures from inside the cab; and what’s more, the driver will also be able to monitor trailer tire temperatures, which should help prevent heat-related blowouts.

To help in determining what you can tow, the Silverado will also display a new label on the doorjamb that is keyed to your VIN and will give you information on your specific vehicle’s gross vehicle weight rating, gross combined weight rating, gross axle weight rating, maximum payload, maximum tongue weight, and your vehicle’s curb weight.

The 2019 Silverado with Advanced Trailering System hits the streets later this year.

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7 Thoughts to “2019 Chevy Silverado introduces new Advanced Trailering System”

  1. Nancy

    Last few campgrounds in MI that I camped at had mostly Chevy Silverados, myself included.

  2. Anthony Vinson

    My ’10 F-150 had trailer guidance on it and all you have to do is step on the parking brake to keep the truck still. If I’m not mistaken, Ford has them beat by a year or two with the TPMS stuff. Chevy has been so far behind Ford and Ram for quite a while. Campgrounds are full with Fords and Ram with good reason.

  3. Tommy Molnar

    Yup. Very few people pay much attention to weights, and very few people have any problems.

    I’m with you Garry & Dar. I’ve got a one ton pickup, and my trailer loaded is 8100 pounds. I figure I’m good to go. I’ve done axle weights, side to side weights, tongue weights, truck weights, and all’s well.

  4. Garry & Dar

    Sadly, most of us have little knowledge of exactly how much extra weight we are adding to our tow vehicles, and RVs as we load them up.
    Personally I load a heap of stuff into the back seat, and bed of my GMC Sierra, and then theres all the food, clothes. comfort items, cocktail mixin’s, wine, and fresh water, etc. that gets loaded into the trailer…
    I “think” I’m within reasonable load limits of both, but without actual weigh scale numbers to go on, I actually have absolutely no idea where I am in the big picture of things.
    Anybody else with me?
    Garry & Dar – Roving RVers – Ottawa Canada

  5. Bob p

    You talk about 5th wheel towing in the first sentence then show a picture of a short bed 1/2T and go on to talk about being able to line up the hitch ball and keeping the hitch aligned. I know all you have to work with is what Chevy gives you but don’t blow smoke without the fire.

    1. Vic

      Believe me there is plenty of fire coming from the new 2019 GM trucks!

  6. Bill Bateman

    During 34 years of towing camp trailers I have run into very few people who know the gcwr for their rigs, let alone towed unit weight or even tongue weight. I hope that weight [especially gcwr] can be addressed more frequently in upcoming rvtravel.com sections.

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