RV Mods: Did you wire your inverter safely?

By Don Wilson When asked questions at my technical seminars, I often find they begin with, “Should I do this…” or “Should I do that?” As you might expect, these are always hard questions to answer regardless of the topic, because each individual operator will have different needs and experiences that are unique to their situation. However, when it comes... Read More

Solar lamp for your campsite or picnic table

  This solar lamp gets its power from the sun and converts it into clean electricity to light your campsite or picnic table. No wires or electrical source required – other than Mr. Sol. It’s convenient, stows easily, and will likely outlast your RV. And you will always have light for that late night poker game or sing-a-long.  In the daytime,... Read More

Should you turn off propane when traveling?

  Here’s a question from a reader of RVtravel.com about boondocking.  Hi Bob, I’m working at a company pumping propane. I’m very shocked at the number of people that travel with propane turned on, seeing that this gas is very volatile and the possibility of an explosion in an accident. It makes me wonder how many RVers are taking their own... Read More

Simpler backing into your RV site

By Steve Savage  Mobility RV Service   If you tow, I suspect you – like most of us – have suffered through the stress that comes along with backing into your space in the campground with everyone watching. The yelling matches between spouses can reach divorce-pending proportions, and discussions about the best way to communicate between the person driving and... Read More

RV Electricity – Can reversed polarity shock you?

  Dear Mike, Your No~Shock~Zone articles are some of the best I’ve ever read about RV electricity. Thanks for educating all of us “non-electrical” types. So here’s my question: During a trip on my boat to the Erie Canal, we had one guy checking electrical outlet polarity, something I never really quite understood. He found many outlets with the wrong... Read More

Boondock near the highest summit in the Lower 48

By Russ and Tiña De Maris It’s a mountain with an interesting history – and a debatable altitude. The first recorded ascent of this highest peak in the contiguous United States was made by a group – not of mountain climbers – but fishermen. Charles Begole, A.H. Johnson and John Lucas tossed away their fishing poles, made the climb and... Read More

Wildlife Refuges – often National Park next-door neighbors

By Russ and Tiña De Maris RVers spend plenty of time on America’s public lands. National Parks are a natural. National Forests get plenty of visits. Many have discovered the Out West treasures managed by the Bureau of Land Management. But one part of your public lands sometimes gets neglected – Wildlife Refuges, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife... Read More