Dogs, dogs. . . wherever you look

Dogs, dogs. . . wherever you look

 

A typical camping scene.

By Chuck Woodbury
Dogs are a part of RV life, even if you don’t have one of your own. And when you travel full-time in an RV, it’s a dog show wherever you go. No matter whether you’re in a public campground or an RV park, you will see dog owners parading by all day long with their animals.

They’re big, they’re small, they’re every breed. Some are of a parentage you could never guess.

If you live in a regular house, one that does not move, you likely see the same dogs over and over. Pretty soon you’ll know their names. But when you move around frequently with an RV, if you love dogs, you will make many new canine friends. For example, right now, next door to me, is a small, white mutt named Mollie. Gail and I had barely pulled into our campsite when she and her owner rushed over to greet us. “Mollie couldn’t wait to see you,” the woman said. Mollie proceeded to apply ample dog slobber to Gail via a hyperactive tongue.

Kiefer

Gail and I both love dogs, but she adores them. She was in heaven in Medford, Ore., a few months ago when she was able to walk next door to a dog agility trials event at the country fairgrounds. She even volunteered to help one day.

On the occasions where we stay a week or more in one place, Gail will know the names of at least a dozen dogs before we leave. In many cases, she will have offered her free dog walking service, just to spend a little more time with a particular pooch. As I have said before, she had a nice time visiting with Kiefer the Schnauzer a few weeks ago.

We don’t have a dog for various reasons I will not explain here. The owners of dogs who we talk with say basically the same thing, “They’re a lot of work and responsibility. . .” and then in so many words they say they would not have it any other way.

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18 thoughts on “Dogs, dogs. . . wherever you look

  1. Karen Byrd

    Our park does not allow dogs thank god. The residents got the dogs kicked out because they refused to clean up after their precious little pups.

    1. Loneoutdoorsman

      Right on Karen. RV dog owners have created their own little slice of Hell. Yes there is such a place, Ol Beelzebub gonna throw me in a cell with all my x-wives—and their mothers and their dogs.
      Anyway, it would be nice if dog owners followed the campground rules. Ey can’t express my true feelings because Diane asked me to tone down my language.
      Loneoutdoorsman

      1. RV Staff

        Big Sister is watching you. 😉 😀 —Diane at RVtravel.com

  2. Dawn

    I do agree that parks say you can have two dogs weight 16 pounds .At the park we were in they had great Danes and 2 or three dogs very large or they walk their dogs by they are in the golf cart and the dog runs along side of it .Or they are riding their bike and going so fast the dog poops on the road and he does not even stop to pick it up.This was are first trip out in are trailer camping and we have a 42ft trailer and one little dog I do not know how people travel with large dogs in small trailers.Yes I do have a stroller for my dog she is a pug and older girl and when i go for a 5 mile walk she would not be able to walk that far. I feel if we all as pet owners pick-up after are fur babies then it will not give people a better feeling about are animals more places are getting to be very dog friendly.

  3. Corley

    On dog strollers: You don’t know the dog’s needs, so don’t criticize. I’ve had several dogs that were aging or had medical problems. One had Cushing’s disease and couldn’t walk more than a couple hundred feet, so he needed a ride. Right now I have a 13 yr old that can’t walk far due to hind quarter weakness, and out came the ten year old stroller. Another one had knee surgery. The stronger dog gets a walk, and the weaker one gets fresh air and watches the smokers sit outside their rigs.

  4. Rob

    I am not a Dog lover, but neither do I dislike dogs. They are smarter than their owners realize.
    My “Beef” is with the dog owners. Most owners think their dogs bark is the cutest thing and how can anybody not like it? But if you do not own a dog the persistent barking is like Chinese water torture. Owners are also to lazy to take the time to train the dog not to bark.
    I did not pay a park camping fee to come and hear dogs barking.
    Pet Owners need to realize that. If I played music to loud I would sure hear about it real fast, The same should apply to barking dogs.
    I have complained to rangers about particularly annoying dogs and they rarely seem to want to get involved. If my music was to loud, they would surly let me know about it.
    If you own a dog, one of the responsibilities you have is to have him under control at all times. It is not hard to teach a dog not to bark, take the time, look up methods on youtube, and give your neighbor some peace and quiet while camping.
    I have noticed some parks are using dog loops. This is a great idea, but the dogs still need to be quiet or you have a whole loop of barking dogs.
    Signed; Hoping to rest in Peace

  5. Ardis

    I will continue to travel with my trained and well behaved lab without regard to what people think. If you really want to know about a person, watch the way they treat old people and dogs.

    1. Chuck Woodbury

      Ardis, it seems to me if you travel with a well-behaved dog, all other RVers will think is “what a nice dog!”

      1. Ardis

        That is my hope!

  6. Lindana

    Must comment on the parks where we actually see folks “walking” their dogs in doggie strollers. If this isn’t the height of idiocy, I don’t know what is! I would understand if the pet is crippled or otherwise incapacitated, but this is not the case with these animals. We don’t have a pet because we think it is unkind to keep them penned up while we travel 6-8 hours.
    On another front, we are going to be looking at a newer Class C in the months to come and would like to know if you can direct us to a source that rates/compares RV’s.

    1. Chuck Woodbury

      Lindana,

      Yeah, I’ve always wondered about the doggie strollers. Don’t dogs like to walk? I think they do make sense, for example, at crowded events like RV shows and county fairs, where a little dog could get stepped on. But, then, why not just leave the dog home? Oh, well. As far as an RV comparison site, I can’t recommend one. Some people would say RV. org is good, but I have received mixed comments from RVers, some think it is great, others think they wasted their money there. Keep reading this newsletter, visit RV dealers and shows and when you have narrowed your choices explore forums and other online resources where owners talk about the models you’re considering. Above all, take your time and never buy on impulse. “Look below the hood,” as they say in car-buying lingo.

  7. RV-Manny

    As a RV-Newbie I state that there are way too many dogs allowed in RV-Parks and Campgrounds. I do like dogs a lot, but when I see dog owners walking their dogs on other RV-Sites and don’t even pick up their mess, this a complete No-Go. A dog needs to go out and walk or run and their (mostly heavyweight) owners as well, but not only to the neighbors site. RV-Parks rules often allow max. 6ft, leashes, but most owners use up to 30ft roll leashes. so they walk through the park roads and let there animals go between sites and let them doing without watching what they do. In one RV-Park I had a neighbor wir four (4) dogs, two great Danes and two little ones. I could not believe, four dogs and four people in a 32ft 5th-wheel. I should call it animal cruelty. Parks should limit to a maximum of two dogs per RV. It’s irresponsible to keep four dogs in an RV, especially if the owners are not able to go out with the dog(s) for 1-2 hours per day. And that’s what a dog daly needs.

  8. marilyn schmotzer

    I find it quite offensive when I am picking up after my Labrador Retriever and I inadvertently step into a very small dog mess. The 1st time this happened I wasn’t aware of it until I entered our RV and smelled something suspicious on the carpet.. Wearing tennis shoes involved quite a bit of time trying to clean them off..And then I had to clean the carpet. People with small pooches don’t always realize that their little dog’s poop mess can impact others in a very negative way.

  9. Tim McGuire

    We recently completed a 2 month tour of Texas and they have a real problem with dog poop! Almost every trail we were on you had to keep your eyes down or you’d be in it. I think it’s disgusting and we won’t go back there.

    1. Chuck Woodbury

      That’s really a shame, Tim. It’s too bad there are dog owners who simply do not care about others.

      1. Cheryl Bisson

        I find irresponsible dog owners are not just exclusive to Texas. I’m a Texan and am addament about picking up after my dogs. The very first thing I do when we set-up in a new park is check the dog run(s) to see if they are clean and walk all around checking to see if the areas are clean. Some are better than others, but there are a lot of people that don’t pick up after their dogs. For some reason mostly people with small dogs. I certainly don’t like to step in larger or small dog pooh and find it terrible annoying and rude that people choose not to pick up. It’s your resonsibility as a dog owner to pick-up. This is an on-going frustration for me and I wish I could let it go, but I will pick up after others before I let my dogs in the dog areas.

  10. Tom

    Sign at local vet’s office. “If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise.”
    We travel with three assorted cats.

  11. PeteD

    We travel with 3,yes 3, bichons. They are a lot of work just like our kids used to be. They do get us out walking more often and we do meet people we probably wouldn’t have without the dogs. They are good travelers but they get real excited when we get back home. The first place they want to go is their own fenced backyard where the can run free again and chase their favorite squirrel.

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