Four major cities to ban all diesel vehicles

Four major cities to ban all diesel vehicles

 

traffic-772That diesel motorhome or truck you’re driving may be a dinosaur in the making. The leaders of four major cities, from Europe to Central America, are planning to ban all diesel vehicles by the middle of the next decade, the BBC reported.

Time will tell if the movement reaches cities in North America.

In the U.K., campaigners are calling for London’s mayor to commit to phase out diesel vehicles from London by 2025.

In addition, the mayors of Paris, Mexico City, Madrid and Athens have said that they will stop the use of all diesel-powered cars, vans and trucks, which includes motorhomes, by 2025 in order to improve air quality.

In Europe, the BBC reports that diesel-based pollution kills about 467,000 people a year. The particulates from diesel emissions get into the lungs and cause cardiovascular disease, while the nitrogen oxides form ground-level ozone which causes breathing difficulties.

The diesel ban is hugely significant, noted the BBC. Carmakers will look at this decision and speculate it’s just a matter of time before other city mayors follow suit. Here in the U.S., RV makers will likely do the same.

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21 thoughts on “Four major cities to ban all diesel vehicles

  1. Jeff

    I have driven a school bus for seven years and our busses are diesel and this is the first year I have not had any bronchitis and or respiratory issues. The difference is that anytime I am in the bus yard I wear a mask.
    Interesting also is that at the state emission testing centers the employees are required to wear mask when ever they are testing a diesel vehicle.

  2. Rvgrandma

    I hate diesel pickups – they are noise pollution in RV parks! I hate getting behind diesel trucks that spew out black smoke causing you to cough. Doing away would be impractical. They just need to set emission standards for diesel like gas powered. Make the truck owners keep them in better working order so they don’t spew out the black smoke, etc.

    1. Josie

      Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr….

    2. Susan Callihan

      Diesel vehicles produced prior to 2011 are dirty and smoky IF they are not properly maintained. I’ve been stuck behind many gasoline powered vehicles with the same problem – not properly maintained. However, diesels produced after 2011 are cleaner, with minimal particular emissions, due to the use of DEF. Let’s not wrap all diesel vehicles in with the older, not maintained ones.

      1. R M Roberts

        in 2009 the Federal gov. required that all diesel vehicles use DEF fluid to clean up the engine exhaust and fumes. As you said this has worked well, but Europe and South America has not adopted those regulations or took any measures. I feel they will soon determine how impractical the banning of diesels are. large Urban areas depend on diesel trucks to keep the cities supplied with all sorts of necessities……

  3. Billy Bob

    And the EU comes to an abrupt END. There is a sea change coming, and a new dawn. Buckle your seatbelts ladies and gents, i’m likin it! Long live fossil fuels.

  4. Keith Sturtz

    All freight lines should refuse to haul into subject cities. They should drop loads at the city limits and charge a 500% dropping charge for doing so and then require that shipments be taken into the city on their special fleet of gas or electric haulers applying another 500% hauling fee.

  5. George

    Did you know that 76.8423% of statistics are made up on the spot.

    1. Chuck Woodbury

      George, with due respect, that includes the one you just used. Back in college, I remember a business class where we discussed “Lying with Statistics.” Yup, I know many are estimates, wild guesses or outright exaggerations. Some are real, of course. Maybe your statistic is close to accurate. Nobody really knows, that’s for sure. — Chuck/editor

      1. Fred Huling

        That was “Snark”

    2. RV Staff

      In reply to George:
      😀 😀 —Diane at RVtravel.com

  6. Doug G.

    This seem unlikely to happen in the us simply because that would be considered regulating interstate commerce, which, under the Constitution, is under the purview of the Federal Gov’t. only, not the states or municipalities. That’s why you see these 53″ long tractor trailers trying to negotiate city streets to make deliveries.

  7. Glenn

    This is absolute BS
    For any of you who have visited Europe, what percentage of their daily drivers are diesel?
    My bet is its the higher percentage because the diesel powered cars get much better mileage compared to gas powered. And this doesn’t seem to take into account DEF

    1. Cindy

      Yes diesels are favored even in colder climates of northern Europe. And yes, it’s due to a couple of things: (1) mileage and (2) ease of repairs and parts. Most of the diesel cars are actually manufactured in Europe (e.g. Volkswagon, BMW, etc.). Doing away with them would hurt the automotive industry. I don’t believe it would make a great difference in air quality. Let’s face it, it’s NOT practical for everyone to drive an electric car, but that’s what would have to happen. Not practical for commercial trucks at all.

  8. Truman

    i don’t think they have all the smog checks and recheck that we do here in the good old USA on our autos and trucks ????

    1. Cindy

      I’ve lived in Latvia for nearly 19 years. Our cars are emissions tested (and safety tested) every year and must meet certain standards or be repaired. I’m sure that’s true of all these cities. It isn’t the smog produced by one car that’s the problem. Smog is caused by congestion – too much traffic in a congested area. There are VERY few diesels in CA in comparison to Europe and yet CA is infamous for its smog. Even eliminating all diesel trucks wouldn’t solve the problems. It troubles me that the environmentalists have called for 0% emissions. That’s not possible. But diesels are the target because that’s their goal. Ridiculous – even gas powered cars have emissions. I also dispute their figures on how many people die of diesel induced lung disease. How do you test for that? Where are the comparison figures? I don’t believe the studies would bear them out. Consider we have a larger population today so I would expect death by lung disease to go up as the population does. Let’s not blame diesel cars from Europe which has very strict standards about these things. Europeans are obsessed with air quality and climate change, etc. All of the cities mentioned have one thing in common – they are congested with traffic. That is the cause of the smog problem.

  9. Tommy Molnar

    “In Europe, the BBC reports that diesel-based pollution kills about 467,000 people a year”. How do they come up with this stuff? They know exactly how many people die from cigarette smoke, air pollution, tainted food, bad toothpaste, nuclear power, ant poison, rotten watermelon, doctor’s mistakes, etc. But Europe is totally screwed up anyway so no surprise there.

    And if they ban diesel engines, just what is going to power the trucks that make the country work and move?

    1. Pete D

      I always get a kick of how they pick numbers out of the air for these statistics and no one questions it. The article could have said ten million die and few would question it. When something says “scientific evidence says” a red flag goes up for me. Science isn’t science anymore. It’s an agenda.

      1. Walter Cooke

        Science is study. People’s agenda driven conclusions can distort the facts revealed through study.

  10. Chuck

    Don’t worry, it will never happen in the USA, with Trump… The EPA will be history…

    1. garrett

      You got that right Chuck.

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