Three woofs for National Dog Day!

Three woofs for National Dog Day!

 

By Emily Woodbury
STAFF WRITER
Today, August 26th, is a day to celebrate our furry friends (ahem, dogs.) There seems to be a national celebration for everything these days, from National Ice Cream Day to National Twins day; however, as much as we like ice cream and twins, there’s nothing Americans want to celebrate more than their dogs. 

                  My spoiled rescue, Astor

The day lends itself to an extra lick of peanut butter, a new squeaky toy, or an “OK, fine. You can sleep on the bed tonight, Spot.” But really, what the day aims to recognize is the high number of dogs that are looking for their fur-ever home. In hopes of saving a life out of the millions that are killed each year in shelters, National Dog Day raises awareness about the importance of adopting a dog from a shelter, rather than purchasing a dog from a breeder or a puppy mill. 

If you’re like me (and I am a bit dog-obsessed) you’ll be giving your pooch some extra love today to celebrate. However, if you feel like extending the love a little further you can find a local donation center here and donate pet food, toys or beds to a shelter animal in need. 

If you can’t find any local events, organize one yourself! “Yappy Hours,” a happy hour for humans and their dogs, are a great way to meet new people and socialize your dog. Organize your own “Yappy Hour” in your campground and celebrate!

The official website for National Dog Day can be found here

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2 thoughts on “Three woofs for National Dog Day!

  1. Clu Carradine

    I knew before I even clicked on this page what I would find, and sure enough, I was right; more breeder-bashing and guilting people for their choices of pets.

    I am a breeder/owner/exhibitor of purebred Samoyed and have also been active in rehoming dogs in need for 45 years…decades before “rescue” was cool. I find the “don’t get a dog from a breeder” statement deeply offensive, not to mention misleading.

    People should buy the dog that is right for them, whether that dog is from a breeder, a rehomer (“rescue”), or the pound. Do your homework. Find the right animal for your home, your family and your situation. Ask questions and spend the time to research the various dogs, breeds, mutts, male, female, big, small, short or longhair, etc.

    It is amazing that people will spend more time and effort to buy a washing machine than they will when it comes to getting a living creature that may live well into its teens, and has all the needs of any living being.

    Don’t guilt people for choosing the dog they have decided is the right one for their family. As a person who breeds and also assists homeless dogs, my goal is 100% about success for the animal and the new owners; I spend a lot of time and effort to ensure the match is right, keep in touch, make myself available at all times, and have a first right of refusal clause in my sales contract (which applies to dogs of my breeding as well as the homeless dogs being rehomed) stipulating that if for any reason at any tine the owners can no longer keep the dog, s/he has a home here, no questions asked.

    Breeders are not “the problem”. The problem is people who can’t or won’t train or keep their animals, then dump them on the streets, at the pound, or on a rescue.

    Please do your homework, ask a lot of questions, learn about dogs and which ones are right for you. Don’t get pushed, bullied and guilted into buying the wrong pet for your home because someone else wants to make that important decision for you. It isn’t fair to you, and it isn’t fair to the dog.

    1. Chuck Woodbury

      Clu,

      Clu, a lot of rambling in your rant. Maybe you do not understand that just because you’re a responsible breeder does not mean that everyone is. Is every breeder just like you? I think not. Ever heard of puppy mills? My sister has recued two greyhounds. Good for her! They would have been killed otherwise.

      So rescuing a dog is cool now, and it wasn’t before? Who says? Unless someone wants a particular breed — and many people do, and in that case should seek out a responsible breeder, then why not visit a few pounds (as I have done more than once to adopt) and find a loving furry buddy that was probably weeks away from a executioner without someone taking him/her home? A good part of your advice here has nothing do with how or where a person gets a dog, but how to treat one once you get it.

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